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Reviews

Blood curdling thrillers from BC authors
Small matter that Maureen Foss, another Sunshine Coast author, has set her latest novel in a crumbling under-funded geriatric hospital that could be almost anywhere in B.C. This Hitchcock-style suspense thriller happens mostly in your head. Definitely not a whodunit - you find out the identity of the murderer in the prologue - this is a gripping tale of evil stalking the unwary.

In another case of humbling police-work, Eugene Starbuck, a psychopathic rat-trapping janitor gets away with several murders and stashes bottled body parts in his basement lair. Amid all this nastiness blossoms another paradoxical love story between Harve, a lonely overweight rent-a-cop, and "average" Annie on the fifth floor, who is singled out by Starbuck as his next victim.

Fortunately, though Annie lives alone, she has a cat with the beguilingly gentle name of Hillary, who, given half-a-chance, will sink her claws into unsuspecting flesh. But let's not give too much away. Tongue-in-cheek humour that pokes fun at all kinds of institutions (even a coffee chain, perhaps?); well-paced writing, believable characters and strong dialogue make for a great read.
-Beth Hayson, Victoria Times-Colonist


The Rat Trap Murders
This fast-paced thriller by BC author Maureen Foss opens at the Brother's Charitable Geriatric Hospital with caretaker Eric Pratt taking a fatal tumble down the sixth floor staircase.

The owners of the private hospital are quick to hire Eugene Starbuck to replace Pratt. The man appears to be the answer to a prayer - he'll work for low pay and is available at a moment's notice, since he has agreed to live on-site.

The reader knows this is not the coincidence it appears to be. It is Eugene's novel job creation plan. The man spotted the job he wanted and made sure the position was vacant by killing the incumbent.

A bit of sabotage increased the demand for an immediate replacement and presto, Eugene has a new job and a place to live. He settles right in.

Soon patients and staff start to disappear. One turns up in the sewer system - or at least most of her does. Others just vanish.

Tension is high at the hospital. Some of the staff starts to think there might be something to the creepy feeling they get from the caretaker.

Readers have been privy to Eugene's murderous deeds from the start. The suspense comes in not knowing who will be caught up in the spider's web.

And once a victim is caught, readers will hold their breath to see if anyone manages to struggle free. Soon the killer has so many unfinished pieces of business pending that he may well end up a victim too.
- Madeleine Mertl, The Canadian Press