New Titles


What I Want to Tell Goes Like This

AVAILABLE
978-0-88971-306-2 - Paperback
5.5" x 8.5" - 256 pages - $21.95
October 2014

By Matt Rader



“These fiercely beautiful stories create a kaleidoscopic vision of a very real but sometimes unsettling world. This is not just another first book of stories, but is something remarkably strong, original and new.”
—Jack Hodgins, author of Cadillac Cathedral

“I love this book for both the swagger and economy of its language, and for the mad and brilliant way it splices time. I love it because it populates its stories with peoples, geographies and lives so often missing from our fictive landscapes, and because it does so with imagination, bravado and a seriously beautiful wit.”
—Madeleine Thien, author of Dogs at the Perimeter

“Matt Rader writes the secret corners of history, pieces the shards of what is forgotten, and tracks the lost. These stories remind us of why literature is important.”
—Tamas Dobozy, author of Siege 13

“‘All lives have secrets and every secret has a life.’ Matt Rader's stories live and breathe in the private space that only the best fiction occupies. Eclectic, idiosyncratic, surprising, completely compelling, I loved this collection. What I want to tell you goes like this: read this book.”
—Michael Crummey, author of Galore



What I Want to Tell Goes Like This is an intensely original first short story collection from acclaimed poet Matt Rader. The last story, "All This Was a Long Time Ago," is the 2014 winner of the Jack Hodgins Founders' Award for fiction from The Malahat Review, and other offerings from the collection have appeared in Event, The New Quarterly, Grain, Joyland, Forget Magazine and the Rusty Toque.

Rader's command of tension is masterful in these dark, off-kilter stories that are largely set in the context of the working/labour class in and around the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island, BC. They alternate between exploring the history of severe labour struggles in the area over a century ago, and the present-day experiences of people sliding through transitional, ambiguous moments in their relationships and sexuality. The juxtaposition of the two time periods seems to hint at the echoes of the harsh, violent legacy of the earlier age and its power struggles that continue to resonate in contemporary life.

In What I Want to Tell Goes Like This, we are witness to the controversial shooting death of infamous union activist Albert "Ginger" Goodwin by a police constable in 1918; to the squalor of tent cities erected on the Royston Bay mudflats during the Great Vancouver Coal Strike of 1912-14; to two boys’ experimentation with sexual violence at the end of a secluded logging road; and to clarity and companionship found in a small cabin by the sea as a son cares for his dying father—a rough man who abandoned him when he was eight. In Rader's artful tales of grit and mystery, danger never feels far away.

The things I heard about you

NOT YET PUBLISHED
978-0-88971-305-5 - Paperback
5.5" x 8" - 88 pages - $18.95
September 2014

By Alex Leslie



"Prose poems, soundtracks, minifictions—the lyrical, multi-faceted pieces in The things I heard about you record the ways in which language makes and unmakes us."
—Jen Currin



Shortlisted for the 2014 Robert Kroetsch award for innovative poetry, The things I heard about you is an exploration of precision and the unspoken, executing a process whereby vignettes and scenes break apart into fragments, rumours or suggestions of the original story. When stories decompose or self-destruct, the results vary, producing an effect of texture and syntactic transformation. This is a book of tidal memories and elegies, love songs to the coast and all its inhabitants. The things I heard about you is Alex Leslie’s debut poetry collection.
O Canada Crosswords Book 15

NOT YET PUBLISHED
978-0-88971-304-8 - Paperback
8.5" x 11" - 232 pages - $12.95
September 2014

By Gwen Sjogren



"I've designed hundreds of crosswords, but my goal is always the same. People often equate crosswords with brain gym, but my hope is that solvers come away with some smiles and chuckles, too.”—Gwen Sjogren


With eighty-five all new crosswords, Gwen Sjogren's O Canada Crosswords Book 15 features plenty of puns and challenging wordplay for Canadian solvers from coast to coast. The specifically Canadian-themed crosswords cover writers, landmarks, music and cities, and include puzzles called Shining in Sochi, Leading Canadian Men, National Parks and Playing for Keeps (about hockey stars who never left their teams). This cornucopia of Canadiana covers new ground with themes on music, awards, tennis and exports that require a certain measure of Canuck knowledge.

Gwen Sjogren has garnered the respect of her devoted crossword fans by crafting clever clues and thoughtful themes, wordplay, puzzle design and trivia. In addition to the favourite layouts, Book 15 contains ten puzzles that have no fill-in-the-blank clues. For people who love witty brainteasers, O Canada Crosswords 15 is the ultimate collection.

For Your Safety Please Hold On

NOT YET PUBLISHED
978-0-88971-303-1 - Paperback
5.5" x 8" - 96 pages - $18.95
September 2014

By Kayla Czaga



"For Your Safety Please Hold On is Czaga’s answer to Moure’s Domestic Fuel and Solie’s Short Haul Engine... and like Moure and Solie we don’t need to expect great things from her. Great things are already here." —Elizabeth Bachinsky



For Your Safety Please Hold On is a truly remarkable first poetry collection from debut talent Kayla Czaga. Her poems are already making waves—several from this collection have received award attention, including: The Fiddlehead's 23rd annual Ralph Gustafson Poetry Prize, The Malahat Review's 2012 Far Horizon's Award for Poetry and an Editor's Choice Award in ARC Poetry Magazine's 2012 Poem of the Year Contest. They have also been shortlisted for The New Quarterly's 2013 Occasional Verse Contest, longlisted for CBC's 2013 Canada Writes Poetry Contest and have appeared in literary publications across North America.

The poems in For Your Safety Please Hold On move in thematic focus from family, to girlhood, to adulthood, each permeated by Czaga's lively voice and quick-witted, playful language. They test the line between honest humour and bitter reality in a sophisticated, incisive manner that tugs at the gut and feels true.

The linguistic hopscotch of Czaga's poems about girlhood is often beautifully juxtaposed with feelings of menace or a first taste of smothering expectations—"She sits. She sips her bright pink fingers. / She slips into smart short haircuts, yes, / she does so, and does herself up just so." While her pin prick meditations on contemporary adulthood suggest a yearning for personal meaning and purpose on a larger scale—"I still wander, sometimes, / my coat closing the world out of my body, with pockets / full of garbage, with my slender steady want. I still / make the bed and at bedtime unmake it."

The irrepressible energy of the poems in For Your Safety Please Hold On, paired with their complex balancing act between light and dark, humour and melancholy, innocence and danger, make this collection an extraordinary first offering.

Cycling with the Dragon

NOT YET PUBLISHED
978-0-88971-301-7 - Paperback
5.5" x 8" - 96 pages - $18.95
September 2014

By Elaine Woo



              "Is it all about being a mirror?
I say, You have little hands      He says, You have a little face

—from “Mirror Mirror”


Cycling with the Dragon is a personal investigation of family,love, culture, self, and the helpless feeling of "smallness." Elaine Woo's poems take the form of the words that they speak: she forms an "o" for the buoy that is a child's safety-raft (found in the solitude of a notebook and Harriet the Spy), and weaves a poem about fearing snakes and dreams into a descending slither.

Woo’s poems weave meaning with form, writing in a pastiche of diverse poetic voices who are small by virtue of age or status (be they women, children, ethnic minorities or the creatures of nature). And like tenacious seeds they break through to reach the sun, to face an abusive parent, bullies, the pain of shyness, envy, or racism.

How Does A Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

AVAILABLE
978-0-88971-293-5 - Paperback
5.5" x 8.5" - 120 pages - $19.95
April 2014

By Doretta Lau



"From Glenn Gould to Jeff Wall to an aspiring Miss Hong Kong, Doretta Lau has an imagination larger than the entire country of Canada, which is big. If you want to know how we live today, read this book!" -Gary Shteyngart


Building on the success of the Journey Prize-shortlisted title story, the stories of How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun? present an updated and whimsical new take on what it means to be Canadian. Lau alludes to the personal and political histories of a number of young Asian Canadian characters to explain their unique perspectives of the world, artfully fusing pure delusion and abstract perception with heartbreaking reality. Correspondingly, the book’s title refers to an interview with Chinese basketball star Yao Ming, who when asked about the Shanghai Sharks, the team that shaped his formative sporting years, responded, “How does a single blade of grass thank the sun?” Lau’s stories feature the children and grandchildren of immigrants, transnational adoptees and multiracial adults who came of age in the 1990s—all struggling to find a place in the Western world and using the only language they know to express their hopes, fears and expectations.