New Titles


Our Familiar Hunger

AVAILABLE
978-0-88971-344-4 - Paperback
5.5" x 8.5" - 96 pages - $18.95
April 2018

By Laisha Rosnau





Our Familiar Hunger is a book about the strength, will, struggle and fortitude of generations of women and how those relationships and knowledges interact, inform, transform and burden. These poems are memories of reclaimed history and attempts at starting over in a new place. They are the fractured reality of trickle-down inheritance, studies of the epigenetic grief we carry and the myriad ways that interferes or interprets our best attempts.

Little Wild

AVAILABLE
978-0-88971-337-6 - Paperback
5.5" x 8" - 80 pages - $18.95
April 2018

By Curtis LeBlanc





Little Wild explores the performance of masculinity in contemporary Canada, with a focus on how toxic masculinity relates to mental health, aggression, substance abuse and crises of identity. Through the reimagining of family histories and personal experiences, the poems in this collection exact a representation of a young man in conflict with outdated ideals of virility, struggling to redefine himself on his own terms. Little Wild is a provocative and revealing portrayal of masculinity as it is understood—and misunderstood—in a contemporary and ever-changing context. The poems are as powerful and unsettling as they are stark, combining unsentimental imagery of the natural world with first-person commentary, while exploring narratives of boyhood, adolescence and adulthood.

Listening to the Bees

AVAILABLE
978-0-88971-346-8 - Hardback
6" x 9" - 240 pages - $24.95
April 2018

By Rene Sarojini Saklikar & Mark Winston





Listening to the Bees is a collaborative exploration by two writers to illuminate the most profound human questions: Who are we? Who do we want to be in the world?

Through the distinct but complementary lenses of science and poetry, Mark Winston and Renée Saklikar reflect on the tension of being an individual living in a society, and about the devastation wrought by overly intensive management of agricultural and urban habitats.

Listening to the Bees takes readers into the laboratory and out to the field, into the worlds of scientists and beekeepers, and to meetings where the research community intersects with government policy and business. The result is an insiders’ view of the way research is conducted—its brilliant potential and its flaws—along with the personal insights and remarkable personalities experienced over a forty-year career that parallels the rise of industrial agriculture.

Army of the Brave and Accidental

AVAILABLE
978-0-88971-341-3 - Paperback
5.25" x 8.125" - 192 pages - $19.95
April 2018

By Alex Boyd





A genre-bending retelling of The OdysseyArmy of the Brave and Accidental is a modern fable: a story about relationships, parenthood, and trying to have an impact on the world told from the shifting perspectives of ten characters. A hundred years after James Joyce stitched together a version of the epic tale, Canadian writer and essayist Alex Boyd updates the story as a reflection of Canadian twenty-first-century culture, allowing it to take a radically different cultural snapshot. These reimaginings newly create and colour a contemporary view of modern love without compromising any of the pitfalls or exaltations.

Army of the Brave and Accidental is funny, deft, wise and poetic all at once. The epic spans major cities such as Toronto and New York and is a coming-of-age story, a journey, a love story and a tragi-comedy.

After the Hatching Oven

AVAILABLE
978-0-88971-342-0 - Paperback
5.5" x 8" - 96 pages - $18.95
April 2018

By David Alexander





After the Hatching Oven explores chickens: their evolution as a domesticated species; their place in history, pop culture and industrial agriculture; their exploitation and their liberation. Alexander takes us deep into the world of this common species, examining every conceivable angle: chicken politics, antics, pretenses and pleasures. These poems delight in the mastery of language and intensity by which Alexander has thought his way into the very cells of his subjects through riffs on Ted Hughes’ Crow, a Burger King ad campaign and a public health advisory for bird flu, as well as self-translations.